Saturday, March 27, 2010

Not all PAOs are created equal, part 2 ...

A skater at the rink asked me to do a high-level dance on Sunday. I told him that (obviously) I couldn't do it, and that I might never recover enough to do it. He was partly joking, but then he said that I should be able to do it some day, because he knew another ice dancer who had the same surgery I had who could now skate just as well as she could before.

This shouldn't bother me, but it did. To compare two people's recovery is really unfair. I am only 4 months out from my second PAO, and while I have never met the other skater, I understand hers was many years ago. I don't know if she had bilateral PAOs or just one. I don't know if her skating muscles were cut or not. I don't know her age or fitness level.

The person who asked me to dance seemed to think that I was pretty full of shit and that I was making a big deal out of nothing - and that I should be just fine soon. I certainly hope he is right, because I would really like to be just fine some day. But realistically, I know my body. It is going to take a long time, and a lot of work, to make progress in my flexibility, which is greatly limited despite yoga twice a week and daily stretching. Strengh I am more optimistic about, but after hearing other PAO patients' experiences I know that our muscles still tend to fatigue more quickly than pre-surgery, even many years post PAO.

The goal of the PAO was to give me everyday functionality, not to make me a great athlete. The likelihood of getting back to my prior level of function is between slim and none. I am 47 years old, and I don't have hours to spend working out every day. This is a reality I accept. I wish others would accept it too.

5 comments:

Jen said...

I think you're amazing; how many other 47 year olds do all you do - with HEALTHY hips? Just know that you're an inspiration to us hippies. :)

Kara said...

I found your blog while doing a search for information on surgeons in the Pacific NW who do POA. I am 40 and after having hip pain that has increased over the past 10 years, I finally sought medical treatment. I recently was told that I need RPOA for hip dysplagia and have learned quite a deal here at your blog. Still have many questions but thanks for sharing.

TnT said...

Jen - Thanks, I think all of us hippies are pretty inspiring actually.

Kara - If I can answer any questions please let me know.
Terri

Brick said...

I'm still trying to come to terms with not reaching my pre-surgery athletic body, let alone where others think I should be. I think it's difficult for others to imagine what "we've" gone through since we "look" healthy. It's a good thing you know your body so you don't push it too far and to that guy, well he can kiss your @&$!

frankenhip said...

I think you are pretty inspiring! You have to judge your progress by your own metric - only you (and those close to you) know where you've come from or where you want to go. Or how hard the journey was!